Search
Advanced Search
of the following are true

Results

Items (206,833)
This specification covers procedures for identifying wrought products of titanium and titanium alloys
AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is intended to be used as a process verification guide for evaluating implementation of key factors in repair of metal bond parts or assemblies in a repair shop environment. This guide is to be used in conjunction with a regulatory approved and substantiated repair and is intended to promote consistency and reliability
AMS CACRC Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee
Test procedures are described for measuring noise at specific receiver locations (passenger and cargo doors, and servicing positions) and for conducting general noise surveys around aircraft. Procedures are also described for measuring noise level at source locations to facilitate the understanding and interpretation of the data. Requirements are identified with respect to instrumentation; acoustic and atmospheric environment; data acquisition, reduction and presentation, and such other information as is needed for reporting the results. This document makes no provision for predicting APU or component noise from basic engine characteristics or design parameters, nor for measuring noise of more than one aircraft operating at the same time. No attempt is made to suggest acceptable levels of noise or suitable subjective criteria for judging acceptability. ICAO Annex 16 Volume I Attachment C provides guidance on recommended maximum noise levels
A-21 Aircraft Noise Measurement Aviation Emission Modeling
This specification covers an acrylonitrile-butadiene (NBR) elastomer that can be used to manufacture product in the form of sheet, strip, tubing, extrusions, and molded shapes. For molded rings, compression seals, O-ring cord, and molded-in-place gaskets for aeronautical and aerospace applications, use the AMS-P-83461 specification or the MIL-PRF-25732 specification
AMS CE Elastomers Committee
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide guidance for aircraft engine and propeller systems (hereafter referred to as propulsion systems) certification for cybersecurity. Compliance for cybersecurity requires that the engine control, propeller control, monitoring system, and all auxiliary equipment systems and networks associated with the propulsion system (such as nacelle systems, overspeed governors, and thrust reversers) be protected from intentional unauthorized electronic interactions (IUEI) that may result in an adverse effect on the safety of the propulsion system or the airplane. This involves identification of security risks, their mitigation, verification of protections, and their maintenance in service. This document is intended to serve as suitable guidance for propulsion system manufacturers and applicants for propulsion system type certification. It is also intended to provide guidance for subsequent propulsion system integration into
E-36 Electronic Engine Controls Committee
This document provides general and specific design guidance for the development of software data loading equipment for all types of aircraft. The primary purpose of data load is to upload loadable software parts to airborne computers. A secondary function of data load is downloading data from airborne computers. Software data load functionality generally falls into the following categories: Portable Data Loader (PDL) for loading equipment on the ground or carried onto aircraft to perform onboard loading. Airborne Data Loader (ADL) for installation on aircraft to perform onboard loading. Data Load Function (DLF) is software that performs the data loading. This document defines data loaders designed to load avionics equipment over a high-speed interface using an Ethernet network protocol. This document defines media interfaces and protocol requirements specific to all data load functions, whether portable or airborne. This document also describes the desired capabilities of data loading
Airlines Electronic Engineering CommitteeAvionics Maintenance CommitteeFlight Simulator Engineering and Maintenance Committee
This document is intended to supplement the SAE J1939 documents by offering the SAE J1939 information in a form that can be sorted and search for easier use
Truck Bus Control and Communications Network Committee
To present methods which, according to the consensus of the aviation propulsion community represented by SAE Committee E-34, allow the continued assessment of load carrying capacity of current chemistry products during periods of limited or nonavailability of previously used standardized methods
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
The lubricant performance capability for aero propulsion drive systems is derived from the physical properties of the oil and performance attributes associated with the chemical properties of the oil. Physical properties, such as viscosity, pressure-viscosity coefficient and full-film traction coefficient are inherent properties of the lubricating fluid. Chemical attributes are critical for the formation of protective boundary lubricating films on the surfaces to prevent wear and scuffing. These attributes are also associated with surface initiated fatigue (micropitting). To assure performance and to provide required information for engineering design, methodology for at least five oil properties are being studied: (1) pressure-viscosity coefficient, (2) full-film traction coefficient, (3) scuffing resistance, (4) wear resistance, and (5) micropitting propensity. The pressure-viscosity coefficient can be measured either directly by assessing viscosity as a function of pressure using
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This AIR describes the current scientific and engineering principles of gas turbine lubricant performance testing per AS5780 and identifies gaps in our understanding of the technology to help the continuous improvement of this specification
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is intended to evaluate corrosion inhibiting properties of synthetic gas turbine lubricants and gearbox oils
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
The high-temperature deposition test (HTDT) method is designed to evaluate the deposition and degradation characteristics of turbine lubricants when stressed under mixed-phase flow conditions found in certain parts of aviation gas turbine engines. This method is applicable to lubricants that form deposits in the range of 0.1 to 100 mg during the course of a test
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the nomenclature for surface finishes commonly used for sheet and strip in aerospace material specifications. It is applicable to steel and to iron, nickel, cobalt, and titanium base alloys
AMS F Corrosion and Heat Resistant Alloys Committee
This specification establishes the requirements for a hard anodic coating on aluminum and aluminum alloys
AMS B Finishes Processes and Fluids Committee
This SAE Systems Management Standard specifies the Habitability processes throughout planning, design, development, test, production, use and disposal of a system. Depending on contract phase and/or complexity of the program, tailoring of this standard may be applied. Appendix C provides guidance on tailoring standard requirements to fit the various DoD acquisition pathways. The primary goals of a contractor Habitability program include: Ensuring that the system design complies with the customer Habitability requirements and that discrepancies are reported to management and the customer. Identifying, coordinating, tracking, prioritizing, and resolving Habitability risks and issues and ensuring that they are: ◦ Reflected in the contractor proposal, budgets, and plans. ◦ Raised at design, management, and program reviews. ◦ Debated in working group meetings. ◦ Coordinated with Training, logistics, and the other HSI disciplines. ◦ Included appropriately in documentation and deliverable
G-45 Human Systems Integration
The intent is to provide a reference which explains the types of possible changes to AS5780 products and provide appropriate context to the QPG. All product change requests to the QPG will be evaluated on their merits recognizing the content of this AIR is guidance only
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
The lubricant performance capability for aero propulsion drive systems is derived from the physical properties of the oil and the chemical attributes associated with the oil formulation. All properties, such as viscosity, pressure-viscosity coefficient and full-film traction coefficient are inherent properties of the lubricating fluid. Chemical attributes are critical for the formation of protective boundary lubricating films on the surfaces to prevent wear and scuffing. To assure performance and to provide needed information for engineering design, test methodologies for at least five oil properties or attributes are being addressed: (1) pressure-viscosity coefficient, (2) full-film traction coefficient, (3) scuffing resistance, (4) wear resistance, and (5) micropitting propensity. While viscosity versus temperature data are readily available, the above five properties or attributes must be measured under relevant conditions for aero propulsion hardware systems. This document (ARP6156
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This method is intended to evaluate the thermal and oxidative stability of synthetic, ester-based aviation lubricants under defined conditions of time and temperature. This method is applicable to lubricants meeting the compositional and performance requirements of AS5780
null, null
This method is designed to evaluate the coking propensity of synthetic ester-based aviation lubricants under single phase flow conditions found in certain parts of gas turbine engines, for instance in bearing feed tubes. This method is applicable to lubricants with a coking propensity, as determined by this method, falling in the range 0.01 to 5.00 mg
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
Employing ‘ball-on-cylinder’ philosophy, a non-rotating steel ball is held in a vertically mounted chuck and using an applied load is forced against an axially mounted steel cylinder. The test cylinder is rotated at a fixed speed while being partially immersed in a lubricant reservoir. This maintains the cylinder in a wet condition and continuously transports a lubricating film of test fluid to the ball and cylinder interface. The diameter of the wear scar generated on the test ball is used as a measure of the fluid’s lubricating properties. The apparatus can be used, by adjusting the operating conditions, to reproduce two different wear mechanisms; mild and severe wear, the ALTE therefore has the ability to assess a lubricant’s performance in that regard. These mechanisms are described below
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
The intent of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to summarize and review the E34 committee’s efforts to educate the aerospace propulsion lubrication community on the science of micropitting, its consequences, and the various tribology evaluation methods that can be employed under aviation related conditions to differentiate formulation related aggravating factors
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This test method provides procedures for exposing specimens of elastomer materials (AS 568-214 size O-rings) representative of those used in gas turbine engines to lubricants or reference fluids under defined time and temperature conditions. This test includes both suspended and compressed O-rings. Resultant changes in the O-ring’s physical properties (tensile strength, elongation, hardness, mass, volume, and compression set) are measured to determine the amount of deterioration of the elastomer
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This specification covers a neopentyl polyol ester fluid (see 8.2) with AS5780 HPC or MIL-PRF-23699 HTS Class performance
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
The test method describes the procedure for determination of the total acid number (TAN) of new and degraded polyol ester and diester-based gas turbine lubricants by the potentiometric titration technique. The method was validated to cover an acidity range of 0.05 to 6.0 mg KOH g-1. The method may also be suitable for the determination of acidities outside of this range and for other classes of lubricants
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This method is designed to evaluate the coking propensity of synthetic ester-based aviation lubricants under two phase air-oil mist conditions as found in certain parts of a gas turbine engine, for instance, bearing chamber vent lines. Based on the results from round robin data in 2008–2009 from four laboratories, this method is currently intended to provide a comparison between lubricants as a research tool; it is not currently a satisfactory pass/fail test. At this juncture a reference oil may improve reproducibility (precision between laboratories); a formal precision statement will be given when there is satisfactory data and an agreed on, suitable reference oil if applicable
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
The document is a recommended guide for evaluating new or replacement test methods. It considers applicability, suitability, accessibility, and return on effort. Particular emphasis should be placed on completing the “strategy definition” portion of this document (Stage 2), to capture all relevant process stages and complete in a recognizable order for any specific development project. The overall process should: 1 address the rationale behind testing; 2 result in a thorough review of whether a test is fit for purpose; 3 act as a pathway for vetting if a test should be added to AS5780. If, in any project, this process is not an exact fit, users should feel free to adjust, as necessary. The process provides the following stages
E-34 Propulsion Lubricants Committee
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is limited to information about evaluation of a new cadmium-free high-strength copper alloy. The testing described in this AIR was conducted prior to the publication of AS6324 and is intended to provide information regarding evaluation of this new copper alloy. It is recognized that a simple specification such as AS29606 can not cover all possible requirements for performance in every field application. To address this basic issue, the introduction of a new, but similar to already field proven, component requires comparative testing to verify the new component will perform at the same or above level as the already approved component in a broader set of relevant tests
AE-8D Wire and Cable Committee
This document defines the minimum performance levels that are required for electrical wire used in civil aircraft
AE-8D Wire and Cable Committee
This specification covers requirements for material used in electrical insulating heat shrinkable components. The continuous operating temperature of these materials shall range from -75°C to +200°C (-103°F to +392°F). (See 6.1
AE-8D Wire and Cable Committee
Items per page:
1 – 50 of 206833