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Milkins, Eric E.
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A New Look at Oxygen Enrichment 1) The Diesel Engine

BHP Central Research Labs. Shortland, N. S. W.-Geoff R. Rigby
University of Melbourne-Harry C. Watson, Eric E. Milkins
Published 1990-02-01 by SAE International in United States
New concepts in oxygen enrichment of the inlet air have been examined in tests on two direct injection diesel engines, showing: significant reduction in particulate emissions (nearly 80% at full load), increased thermal efficiency if injection timing control is employed, substantial reductions in exhaust smoke under most conditions, ability to burn inferior quality fuels which is economically very attractive and achivement of turbo-charged levels of output with consequential benefits of increased power/mass and improved thermal efficiency. The replacement of an engine's turbocharger and intercooling system with a smaller turbocharger and polymeric membrane elements to supply the oxygen enriched stream should allow improved transient response. NOx emission remain a problem and can only be reduced to normally aspirated engine levels at some efficiency penalty.
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A Before and After Study of the Change to Unleaded Gasoline-Test Results from EPA and Other Cycles

The University of Melbourne-Harry C. Watson, Eric E. Milkins, Steven Lansell, Ken Challenger
Published 1990-02-01 by SAE International in United States
A fleet of 50, 1986-1987 model year cars designed for unleaded gasoline has been tested on the road and on a chassis dynamometer over 5 driving cycles and a wide range of other manoeuvres including steady speeds. It was found that the fuel consumption of this fleet was 17 to 23% (depending on test cycle) less than that of a corresponding fleet to leaded fuelled cars of 1980 model year average. Exhaust emissions were significantly lowered in the range of 45 to 93%. However trend line analysis of the several data sets indicates that the ULG fleet has about 6% higher fuel consumption than would have been expected if there had been a continuing evolution of leaded vehicle technology. The data base produced has applicability to a wide range of planning and design tasks, and those illustrated indicate the effects of speed limit changes and advisory speed signs on fuel consumption and emissions.THE REDUCTION in fuel use by the Australian vehicle fleet brought about by the fuel consumption goals (similar to the CAFE in theā€¦
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