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Real-World Emission Modeling and Validations Using PEMS and GPS Vehicle Data

US Environmental Protection Agency-SoDuk Lee, Carl Fulper, Joseph McDonald, Michael Olechiw
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS) are used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to measure gaseous and particulate mass emissions from vehicles in normal, in-use, on-the-road operation to support many of its programs, including assessing mobile source emissions compliance, emissions factor assessment for in-use fleet modeling, and collection of in-use vehicle operational data to support vehicle simulation modeling programs. This paper discusses EPA’s use of Global Positioning System (GPS) measured altitude data and electronically logged vehicle speed data to provide real-world road grade data for use as an input into the Gamma Technologies GT-DRIVE+ vehicle model. The GPS measured altitudes and the CAN vehicle speed data were filtered and smoothed to calculate the road grades by using open-source Python code and associated packages. Ambient temperature, ambient pressure, humidity, wind direction, and speeds were used to simulate actual driving environment conditions, and to calculate vehicle performance, fuel economy, and emissions associated with environmental effects. Complete engine maps, transmission efficiencies, and vehicle data were used as inputs into the GT-DRIVE+ vehicle model to estimate fuel economy,…
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Benchmarking a 2018 Toyota Camry 2.5-Liter Atkinson Cycle Engine with Cooled-EGR

SAE International Journal of Advances and Current Practices in Mobility

Southwest Research Institute-Josh Alden
US Environmental Protection Agency-John Kargul, Mark Stuhldreher, Daniel Barba, Charles Schenk, Stanislav Bohac, Joseph McDonald, Paul Dekraker
  • Journal Article
  • 2019-01-0249
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) continuing assessment of advanced light-duty automotive technologies in support of regulatory and compliance programs, a 2018 Toyota Camry A25A-FKS 4-cylinder, 2.5-liter, naturally aspirated, Atkinson Cycle engine with cooled exhaust gas recirculation (cEGR) was benchmarked. The engine was tested on an engine dynamometer with and without its 8-speed automatic transmission, and with the engine wiring harness tethered to a complete vehicle parked outside of the test cell. Engine and transmission torque, fuel flow, key engine temperatures and pressures, onboard diagnostics (OBD) data, and Controller Area Network (CAN) bus data were recorded. This paper documents the test results under idle, low, medium, and high load engine operation. Motoring torque, wide open throttle (WOT) torque and fuel consumption are measured during transient operation using both EPA Tier 2 and Tier 3 test fuels. The design and performance of this 2018 2.5-liter engine is described and compared to Toyota’s published data and to EPA’s previous projections of the efficiency of an Atkinson Cycle engine with cEGR. The Brake Thermal Efficiency…
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Predictive GT-Power Simulation for VNT Matching to EIVC Strategy on a 1.6 L Turbocharged GDI Engine

Environmental Protection Agency-Joseph McDonald
Garrett Motion-Aaron Birckett
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
The use of early intake valve closing (EIVC) can lead to improvements in spark-ignition engine efficiency. One of the greatest barriers facing adoption of EIVC for high power-density applications is the challenge of boosting as EIVC strategies reduce volumetric efficiency. Turbochargers with variable nozzle turbines (VNT) have recently been developed for gasoline applications operating at high exhaust gas temperatures. The use of a single VNT as a boost device may provide a lower-cost option compared to two-stage boosting systems or 48 V electronic boost devices for some EIVC applications. A predictive model was created based on engine testing results from a 1.6 L turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine [1]. The model was tuned so that it predicted burn-rates and end-gas knock over an engine operating map with varying speeds, loads, compression ratios and fuel types. Using the model, an assessment of VNT performance was implemented using compressor and turbine maps made available from Garrett Motion, Inc. Results show that the single VNT device supports mild EIVC across the operating map while maintaining acceptable full-load performance…
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Predictive GT-Power Simulation for VNT Matching on a 1.6 L Turbocharged GDI Engine

Honeywell Transportation Systems-Aaron Birckett
Southwest Research Institute-Dennis Robertson, Graham Conway, Chris Chadwell
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The thermal efficiency benefits of low-pressure (LP) exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in spark-ignition engine combustion are well known. One of the greatest barriers facing adoption of LP-EGR for high power-density applications is the challenge of boosting. Variable nozzle turbines (VNTs) have recently been developed for gasoline applications operating at high exhaust gas temperatures (EGTs). The use of a single VNT as a boost device may provide a lower-cost option compared to two-stage boosting systems or 48 V electronic boost devices for some LP-EGR applications. A predictive model was created based on engine testing results from a 1.6 L turbocharged gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine [1]. The model was tuned so that it predicted burn-rates and end-gas knock over an engine operating map with varying speeds, loads, EGR rates and fuel types. Using the model, an assessment of VNT performance was performed using compressor and turbine maps made available from Honeywell Transportation Systems. Results show that the single VNT device supports LP-EGR across the operating map while maintaining realistic full-load performance and maintaining or improving upon thermal efficiency…
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Modeling and Controls Development of 48 V Mild Hybrid Electric Vehicles

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-SoDuk Lee, Jeff Cherry, Michael Safoutin, Anthony Neam, Joseph McDonald, Kevin Newman
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis tool (ALPHA) was created by EPA to evaluate the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions of Light-Duty (LD) vehicles. ALPHA is a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulator capable of analyzing various vehicle types combined with different powertrain technologies. The ALPHA desktop application was developed using MATLAB/Simulink. The ALPHA tool was used to evaluate technology effectiveness and off-cycle technologies such as air-conditioning, electrical load reduction technology and road load reduction technologies of conventional, non-hybrid vehicles for the Midterm Evaluation of the 2017-2025 LD GHG rule by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ). This paper presents controls development, modeling results, and model validation for simulations of a vehicle with a 48 V Belt Integrated Starter Generator (BISG) mild hybrid electric vehicle and an initial model design for a 48 V inline on-axis P2-configuration mild hybrid electric vehicle. Both configurations were modeled with a MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow tool, which has been integrated into EPA’s ALPHA vehicle model and was also used to model components within Gamma Technology GT-DRIVE simulations.…
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Benchmarking a 2016 Honda Civic 1.5-Liter L15B7 Turbocharged Engine and Evaluating the Future Efficiency Potential of Turbocharged Engines

SAE International Journal of Engines

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-Mark Stuhldreher, John Kargul, Daniel Barba, Joseph McDonald, Stanislav Bohac, Paul Dekraker, Andrew Moskalik
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0319
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) continuing assessment of advanced light-duty (LD) automotive technologies to support the setting of appropriate national greenhouse gas (GHG) standards and to evaluate the impact of new technologies on in-use emissions, a 2016 Honda Civic with a 4-cylinder 1.5-liter L15B7 turbocharged engine and continuously variable transmission (CVT) was benchmarked. The test method involved installing the engine and its CVT in an engine-dynamometer test cell with the engine wiring harness tethered to its vehicle parked outside the test cell. Engine and transmission torque, fuel flow, key engine temperatures and pressures, and onboard diagnostics (OBD)/Controller Area Network (CAN) bus data were recorded.This article documents the test results for idle, low, medium, and high load engine operation, as well as motoring torque, wide-open throttle (WOT) torque, and fuel consumption during transient operation using both EPA Tier 2 and Tier 3 test fuels. Particular attention is given to characterizing enrichment control during high load engine operation. Results are used to create complete engine fuel consumption and efficiency maps and estimate CO2…
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Modeling and Validation of 48V Mild Hybrid Lithium-Ion Battery Pack

SAE International Journal of Alternative Powertrains

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-SoDuk Lee, Jeff Cherry, Michael Safoutin, Joseph McDonald, Michael Olechiw
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0433
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
As part of the midterm evaluation of the 2022-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Standards, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed simulation models for studying the effectiveness of 48V mild hybrid electric vehicle (MHEV) technology for reducing CO2 emissions from light-duty vehicles. Simulation and modeling of this technology requires a suitable model of the battery. This article presents the development and validation of a 48V lithium-ion battery model that will be integrated into EPA’s Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) vehicle simulation model and that can also be used within Gamma Technologies, LLC (Westmont, IL) GT-DRIVE™ vehicle simulations. The battery model is a standard equivalent circuit model with the two-time constant resistance-capacitance (RC) blocks. Resistances and capacitances were calculated using test data from an 8 Ah, 0.4 kWh, 48V (nominal) lithium-ion battery obtained from a Tier 1 automotive supplier, A123 Systems, and developed specifically for 48V mild hybrid vehicle applications. The A123 Systems battery has 14 pouch-type lithium-ion cells arranged in a 14 series and 1 parallel (14S1P) configuration. The RC battery model…
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Evaluation of Emerging Technologies on a 1.6 L Turbocharged GDI Engine

Southwest Research Institute-Graham Conway, Dennis Robertson, Chris Chadwell
US Environmental Protection Agency-Joseph McDonald, John Kargul, Daniel Barba, Mark Stuhldreher
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Low-pressure loop exhaust gas recirculation (LP- EGR) combined with higher compression ratio, is a technology package that has been a focus of research to increase engine thermal efficiency of downsized, turbocharged gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. Research shows that the addition of LP-EGR reduces the propensity to knock that is experienced at higher compression ratios [1]. To investigate the interaction and compatibility between increased compression ratio and LP-EGR, a 1.6 L Turbocharged GDI engine was modified to run with LP-EGR at a higher compression ratio (12:1 versus 10.5:1) via a piston change. This paper presents the results of the baseline testing on an engine run with a prototype controller and initially tuned to mimic an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) baseline control strategy running on premium fuel (92.8 anti-knock index). This paper then presents test results after first adding LP-EGR to the baseline engine, and then also increasing the compression ratio (CR) using 12:1 pistons. As a last step, the 10.5 CR engine with LP-EGR was run on regular fuel (87.7 anti-knock index) to verify that…
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Modeling and Validation of 12V Lead-Acid Battery for Stop-Start Technology

US EPA-SoDuk Lee, Joseph McDonald
US Environmental Protection Agency-Jeff Cherry, Michael Safoutin
Published 2017-03-28 by SAE International in United States
As part of the Midterm Evaluation of the 2017-2025 Light-duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Standards, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed simulation models for studying the effectiveness of stop-start technology for reducing CO2 emissions from light-duty vehicles.Stop-start technology is widespread in Europe due to high fuel prices and due to stringent EU CO2 emissions standards beginning in 2012. Stop-start has recently appeared as a standard equipment option on high-volume vehicles like the Chevrolet Malibu, Ford Fusion, Chrysler 200, Jeep Cherokee, and Ram 1500 truck. EPA has included stop-start technology in its assessment of CO2-reducing technologies available for compliance with the standards. Simulation and modeling of this technology requires a suitable model of the battery.The introduction of stop-start has stimulated development of 12-volt battery systems capable of providing the enhanced performance and cycle life durability that it requires. Much of this activity has involved advanced lithium-ion chemistries, variations of lead-acid chemistries, such as absorbed-glass-mat (AGM) designs, and lead-carbon formulations.EPA tested several AGM batteries that are used in OEM start-stop systems. The purpose of this testing was…
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Air Flow Optimization and Calibration in High-Compression-Ratio Naturally Aspirated SI Engines with Cooled-EGR

US Environmental Protection Agency-SoDuk Lee, Charles Schenk, Joseph McDonald
Published 2016-04-05 by SAE International in United States
As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) “Midterm Evaluation of Light-duty Vehicle Standards for Model Years 2022-2025 [1]”, the U.S. EPA is evaluating engines and assessing the effectiveness of future engine technologies for reducing CO2 emissions. Such assessments often require significant development time and resources in order to optimize intake and exhaust cam variable valve timing (VVT), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) flow rates, and compression ratio (CR) changes. Mazda SkyActiv-G spark-ignition (SI) engines were selected by EPA for an internal engine development program based upon their high geometric compression ratio (14:1 in Europe and Japan, 13:1 in North America) and their use of a flexible valve train configuration with electro-mechanical phasing control on the intake camshaft. A one-dimensional GT-Power engine model was calibrated and validated using detailed engine dynamometer test data [2] from 2.0L and 2.5L versions of the SkyActiv-G engine. The calibrated GTPower model and a Mathworks Model-Based Calibration (MBC) tool box are being used by EPA to explore calibration and control development of intake and exhaust cam phasing, and cooled…
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