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Jones, Monica Lynn Haumann
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Sensations Associated with Motion Sickness Response during Passenger Vehicle Operations on a Test Track

University of Michigan-Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Sheila Ebert, Matthew Reed
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Motion sickness in road vehicles may become an increasingly important problem as automation transforms drivers into passengers. The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute has developed a vehicle-based platform to study motion sickness in passenger vehicles. A test-track study was conducted with 52 participants who reported susceptibility to motion sickness. The participants completed in-vehicle testing on a 20-minute scripted, continuous drive that consisted of a series of frequent 90-degree turns, braking, and lane changes at the U-M Mcity facility. In addition to quantifying their level of motion sickness on a numerical scale, participants were asked to describe in words any motion-sickness-related sensations they experienced. Prior to in-vehicle testing, participants were shown a list of sensations that are commonly experienced during motion sickness: head sensations, body temperature change, drowsiness, dizziness, mouth sensations, nausea, or other sensations, which refer to difficulty focusing, irritability, eyestrain, or difficulty concentrating. Participants were instructed not to limit themselves to the list, but rather to report in their own words how they felt throughout the drive. For each sensation, they were also…
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Development of a Vehicle-Based Experimental Platform for Quantifying Passenger Motion Sickness during Test Track Operations

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor-Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Kathleen Sienko, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, Catherine Kinnaird, Carl Miller, Brian Lin, Byoung-Keon Park, John Sullivan, Matthew Reed, James Sayer
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Motion sickness in road vehicles may become an increasingly important problem as automation transforms drivers into passengers. Motion sickness could be mitigated through control of the vehicle motion dynamics, design of the interior environment, and other interventions. However, a lack of a definitive etiology of motion sickness challenges the design of automated vehicles (AVs) to address motion sickness susceptibility effectively. Few motion sickness studies have been conducted in naturalistic road-vehicle environments; instead, most research has been performed in driving simulators or on motion platforms that produce prescribed motion profiles. To address this gap, a vehicle-based experimental platform using a midsize sedan was developed to quantify motion sickness in road vehicles. A scripted, continuous drive consisting of a series of frequent 90-degree turns, braking, and lane changes were conducted on a closed track. The route was selected to be representative of naturalistic urban driving conditions and parameterized in terms of lateral and longitudinal acceleration intensities likely to produce motion sickness. Vehicle instrumentation included simultaneous measure of vehicle acceleration, passenger head kinematics, self-reported motion sickness ratings and…
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Effects of Seat and Sitter Dimensions on Pressure Distribution in Automotive Seats

Univ of Michigan - Ann Arbor-Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Jangwoon Park, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, K. Han Kim, Matthew P. Reed
Published 2017-03-28 by SAE International in United States
Seat fit is characterized by the spatial relationship between the seat and the vehicle occupant’s body. Seat surface pressure distribution is one of the best available quantitative measures of this relationship. However, the relationships between sitter attributes, pressure, and seat fit have not been well established. The objective of this study is to model seat pressure distribution as a function of the dimensions of the seat and the occupant’s body. A laboratory study was conducted using 12 production driver seats from passenger vehicles and light trucks. Thirty-eight men and women sat in each seat in a driving mockup. Seat surface pressure distribution was measured on the seatback and cushion. Relevant anthropometric dimensions were recorded for each participant and standardized dimensions based on SAE J2732 (2008) were acquired for each test seat. Regression models were effective in predicting characteristics of pressure distribution from the anthropometric variables and SAE J2732 dimensions. The resulting models may be useful to evaluate virtual fit simulations of the interaction between the seat and sitter.
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A Pilot Study of Occupant Accommodation and Seat Belt Fit for Law Enforcement Officers

University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute-Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, Matthew Reed
Published 2016-04-05 by SAE International in United States
Law enforcement officers (LEO) make extensive use of vehicles to perform their jobs, often spending large portions of a shift behind the wheel. Few LEO vehicles are purpose-built; the vast majority are modified civilian vehicles. Data from the field indicate that LEO suffer from relatively high levels musculoskeletal injury that may be due in part to poor accommodation provided by their vehicles. LEO are also exposed to elevated crash injury risk, which may be exacerbated by a compromise in the performance of the occupant restraint systems due to body-borne equipment. A pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the application of three-dimensional anthropometric scanning and measurement technology to address critical concerns related to vehicle design. Detailed posture and belt fit data were gathered from five law enforcement officers as they sat in the patrol vehicles that they regularly used and in a mockup of a mid-sized vehicle. The size and shape of the officers was measured with and without police uniform and duty belt using standard anthropometry techniques and a whole-body laser scanner. The new methods…
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