Your Selections

Harrison, R.
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

Integrated Underbonnet Thermal Management Simulation

MIRA Ltd.-A. Skea, A. Jolliffe, R. Harrison, M. R. Jones, P. Cardani, L. Smith
  • Technical Paper
  • 2003-04-0068
Published 2003-05-18 by Institution of Mechanical Engineers in United Kingdom
This paper presents the techniques and results from three underbonnet thermal management tools when used together. The objective of this work was to investigate the extent to which simulation tools could be used to assist with thermal management engineering. The idea was to optimize the potential of CFD, onedimensional cooling system and engine modelling simulation techniques to predict the underbonnet thermal environment by passing the results from each simulation tool into the other tools as input boundary conditions. The CFD model included the solid regions for all the main components of the vehicle to allow for a full thermal analysis. The simulation results compared very well with the validation data provided by Jaguar Cars.The goal of this work was to develop an integrated underbonnet thermal management design analysis technique, which would enable engineers to achieve their goals of shortening development times, improving engineering integrity and saving costs.
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Distributed Engineering of Automotive Manufacturing Machines under the Foresight Vehicle Programme

Loughborough University, UK-A. A. West, R. Harrison, R. H. Weston, R. P. Monfared, D. A. Vera, D. W. Thomas, C. S. McLeod, M. Wilkinson, S. M. Lee, S. F. Qin, M. H. Ong
Published 2002-03-04 by SAE International in United States
A method to enable the impact of a novel component based approach to the implementation of production machinery design and build processes from the perspectives of the manufacturing engineering partners within the automotive industry is reported in this paper. The assessment method is based upon the representation (using CIMOSA based constructs) and simulation (using the ithinktm software package) of the activity, actor and event relationships between distributed partners when involved in a global engine manufacture programme. Assessment is vital to ensure that the impact of any novel approach is appreciated in terms and metrics that are consistent with the current operational and interaction paradigms. Without this information is it extremely difficult for the engineering partners to appreciate the impact of changes on their roles, responsibilities and profits and hence determine a roadmap and timescale for the adoption of the changes associated with the novel technology.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

A Process Definition Environment for Component Based Manufacturing Machine Control Systems Developed Under the Foresight Vehicle Programme

Loughborough University-D. W. Thomas, A. A. West, R. Harrison, C. S. McLeod
Published 2002-03-04 by SAE International in United States
The COMponent Based Paradigm for AGile Automation (COMPAG) provides a component-based solution to engine production-line machine control systems. The traditional PLC system is replaced with a distributed control network containing intelligent nodes comprising locally controlled actuators and sensors.The Process Definition Environment provides support for the specification, configuration, and maintenance of the machine control application and facilitates both the initial design and maintenance stages of the lifecycle by describing the control logic as a set of consistent timing and state transition diagrams commonly used in the initial design stages.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Human Factors Issues in the Application of a Novel Process Description Environment for Machine Design and Control Developed under the Foresight Vehicle Programme

Loughborough University-M. H. Ong, D. Vera, A. A. West, R. Harrison
Published 2002-03-04 by SAE International in United States
In the globalization of the automotive businesses, manufacturing companies and their suppliers are forced to distribute the various lifecycle phases in different geographical locations. Misunderstandings arising from the variety of personnel involved, each with different requirements, backgrounds, roles, cultures and skills for example can result in increased cost and development time.To enable collaborating companies to have a common platform for interaction, the COMPANION project at Loughborough University has been undertaken to develop a common model-based environment for manufacturing automotive engines. Through the use of this environment, the stakeholders will be able to “visualize” consistently the evolution of automated systems at every lifecycle stage i.e. requirements definition, specification, design, analysis, build, evaluation, maintenance, diagnostics and recycle. It is important that the new approach is evaluated with respect to the requirements of the stakeholders since cost and technical issues are unlikely be the only factors that could enable / inhibit the uptake of this new approach. Research has been carried out to study the implications of human factors issues on the application of the COMPANION toolset by…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Component Based Distributed Control Systems for Automotive Manufacturing Machinery Developed under the Foresight Vehicle Programme

Loughborough University, UK-R. Harrison, S. M. Lee, A. A. West
Published 2002-03-04 by SAE International in United States
A component based approach to the design and implementation of distributed control systems for automotive engine manufacturing machines is described in this paper. The research is being undertaken in collaboration with the In-Line and Diesel Engine (IL&DE) division of the Ford Motor Company and several of its leading machine builders. The approach offers significant advantages over traditional methods. The external drivers of change affecting the automotive manufacturing sector are reviewed and the need for a better solution to the design and implementation of control systems is explained within this context. Existing best practise for the implementation of control systems for automotive engine manufacturing machinery is described.The new approach supports the implementation fully distributed control systems where a centralised PLC or PC based controller is not required and the control logic is embedded into the components of the machine. Adoption of this component based approach makes it possible for accurate visualisations of machine behaviour to be more easily made available to interested parties throughout the machine lifecycle (e.g. during simultaneous engineering, runtime monitoring and diagnostics). The…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

A User-Oriented Interface Methodology for Automotive Manufacturing Machines Developed under the Foresight Vehicle Programme

Loughborough University, UK-R. P. Monfared, A. A. West, R. Harrison, M. Wilkinson
Published 2002-03-04 by SAE International in United States
This paper reports on the development and implementation of a user-oriented interface methodology for Human Machine Interfaces (HMIs) on transfer lines and engine assembly machines. This approach to HMI implementation has been developed in conjunction with a Fully Distributed machine Control System (FDCS) that its potential to replace conventional centralised PLC/PC based machine control methods is being investigated by researchers at Loughborough University. The paper also provides a brief description on user and task stereotype models defined for a domain of automotive industry and explains the use of software components to develop a prototype HMI for a machine test rig.
Annotation ability available

A Novel Technology for Twenty-First Century Air Defense

Shorts Missile Systems Limited-R. Harrison
  • Technical Paper
  • 984178
Published 1998-09-08 by Institution of Mechanical Engineers in United Kingdom
The aim of this unclassified paper is to highlight the key issues facing those providing air defense solutions for the 21st century, and to outline a novel solution which has been proposed and developed to meet the predicted needs of that era.The key novel features involved in this solution are very high velocity, a hit to kill lethality mechanism, total immunity to countermeasures, and the ability to deal with air and ground targets either in or out of clutter.The paper will explain the reasons for adopting the novel concept and gives some indication, within the limits of the classification, of what the system is capable of achieving in a variety of roles, and from a variety of launch platforms including MANPADS, ground vehicles and helicopters.The key conclusions are that the solution, which is called Starstreak, is well suited to the needs of the 21st century air defense arena, and that is offers a quantum improvement in effectiveness against air targets in or out of clutter, and in the presence of countermeasures, as well as a…

Progress in the Design of Electric Drives for Modular Robotic Systems

Loughborough University of Technology-G. G. Rogers, R. H. Weston, R. Harrison, A. H. Booth
  • Technical Paper
  • 864363
Published 1986-01-01 by Institution of Mechanical Engineers in United Kingdom
The requirements of electric drives for modular robot systems is considered. Analysis shows that simplicity of use combined with a variety of move types is one of the major requirements. Secondary information concerning "performance objectives" and "styles" of control are suggested as ways to further optimise performance capabilities of the individual modules. A hardware system is proposed and the control strategies examined.