Your Selections

Charan, Anil
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Development and Application of an Objective Metric for Transient Engine Clatter Noise

FCA US LLC-Anil Charan
InDepth Engineering Solutions-Aniket Parbat
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
Several powertrain noise phenomena have been studied over the years. Sound quality metrics, like loudness, sharpness, modulation, and tonality, among others, have been developed to characterize powertrain noises. While these readily available metrics work well on steady state and some transient noises, they do not correlate directly with subjective impressions. Moreover, it is difficult to assign a meaningful single rating for time varying noises that may also be associated with simultaneous variations in frequency content. This paper summarizes the process of creating a vehicle level objective metric and its application to blind noise samples to verify correlation with subjective impressions, particularly in association with clatter noise at moderate engine speeds (2000-3500 rpm) with light to moderate throttle tip-ins. The main results include a single number rating and a rating curve as a function of engine speed useful for comparative NVH assessments of multiple vehicles or of multiple hardware iterations on a development vehicle with objectionable clatter content. The latter application is particularly useful since it gives correct feedback to an uninitiated engineer about the hardware…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Target Setting Process for Hybrid Electric Drives Using TPA, Jury Study, and Torque Management

FCA US LLC-Vinod Singh, Anil Charan
InDepth Engineering Solutions-Aniket Parbat
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
The idea of improved efficiency without compromising the “fun to drive” aspect has renewed the auto industry’s interest toward electrification and hybridization. Electric drives gain from having multiple gear ratios which can use advantageous operating set points thus increasing range. Furthermore, they benefit significantly from frequent decelerations and stopping as is experienced in city driving conditions. To recuperate as much energy as possible, deceleration is done at high torque. This presents an interesting but serious sound quality issue in the form of highly tonal whine harmonics of rapidly changing gears that do not track with vehicle speed thus being objectionable to the vehicle occupants. This paper presents an NVH target setting process for a hybrid electric transmission being integrated into two existing vehicles, one belonging to the premium segment and another aimed at enthusiasts with off-road applications. The demand for power has shifted from mechanical domain into electrical domain, and as such, the solution to electric drive NVH issues also lay partly, in the way these drive systems are calibrated. A time-domain Transfer Path Analysis…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Assessment of Numerical Models and Methods for Noise Radiation Prediction

Aerotek/Caterpillar, Inc.-Jiaohua Shi
Aerotek/General Motors Corp.-Anil Charan
Published 2001-04-30 by SAE International in United States
This paper considers two questions: how does one know when a boundary element mesh is reliable, and what are the advantages and potential pitfalls of various methods for sound radiation prediction. To answer the first question, a mesh checking method is used. With this method velocity boundary conditions are calculated on the nodes of the mesh using a point source or sources placed inside the mesh. A boundary element program is then used to calculate the sound power due to these boundary conditions. The result is compared to the known sound power of the point source or sources. This method has been used to determine the maximum frequency of a mesh, how many CHIEF points to use, etc. The second question is answered by comparing the results of several numerical methods to experimental results for a running diesel engine. The methods examined include the direct and indirect boundary element methods and the Rayleigh integral.
Annotation ability available