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AlRamadan, Abdullah S.
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Fuel Flexibility Study of a Compression Ignition Engine at High Loads

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology-Abdullah S. AlRamadan, Moez Ben Houidi, Gustav Nyrenstedt, Bengt Johansson
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2193
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Engine experiments were performed on a single-cylinder heavy-duty engine at relatively high loads to investigate the regions where the combustion characteristics are unchanged regardless of the fuel octane number. Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) and three different commercial fuels with RON values ranging from 0 to 100 were tested in this study. A sweep of net indicated mean effective pressure (IMEPNet) of 5 to 20 bar, absolute intake pressure of 1.5 to 2.8 bar, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) of 0 to 40%, and fuel injection pressure of 700 to 1400 bar were performed to investigate the combustion characteristics, ignition delay time, combustion duration, efficiency, and emissions. At the highest load point (IMEPNet = 20 bar), all the fuels burn as in conventional diesel combustion. Despite the wide range of octane numbers, all fuels had similar ignition delay time, combustion duration, indicated efficiency, and emissions at 10 to 20 bar IMEPNet. It follows that CI mode is the only realistic option at high load and pressure points. All fuels showed similar combustion duration and emission levels behavior…
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Compression Ratio and Intake Air Temperature Effect on the Fuel Flexibility of Compression Ignition Engine

King Abdullah Univ of Science & Tech.-Abdullah S. AlRamadan, Moez Ben Houidi, Bassam S. E. Aljohani, Hassan Eid, Bengt Johansson
Published 2019-09-09 by SAE International in United States
The effect of compression ratio (CR) and intake air temperature on the combustion characteristics of fuels with different octane ratings were investigated on a single-cylinder heavy duty engine. The study focused on Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) and commercial grade diesel with octane numbers ranging from 0 to 100. The engine was configured at a CR of 11.5:1, which is lower than typical heavy-duty compression ignition CI engines. This aims to compare the fuels’ burning regime with recently reported measurements at CR17:1. Experiments were performed at different intake air temperatures of 20 to 80 °C and net indicated mean effective pressure (IMEPNet) of 5 to 20 bar. The injection rates have been characterized to determine the hydraulic delay of the injector and thus define the actual ignition delay time. At low loads, diesel-like fuels were found to burn in partially premixed combustion (PPC) mode whereas high octane fuels did not ignite. At high loads, fuels combustion becomes diffusion driven regardless of their RON or MON values. The effect of intake air temperature on the combustion characteristics…
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The Physical and Chemical Effects of Fuel on Gasoline Compression Ignition

King Abdullah University of Science & Technology-R. Vallinayagam, Ponnya Hlaing, Abdullah S. AlRamadan, Yanzhao An, Bengt Johansson
Saudi Aramco-Jaeheon Sim, Junseok Chang
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
In the engine community, gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines are at the forefront of research and efforts are being taken to commercialize an optimized GCI engine in the near future. GCI engines are operated typically at Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) mode as it offers better control of combustion with improved combustion stability. While the transition in combustion homogeneity from convectional Compression Ignition (CI) to Homogenized Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion via PPC has been comprehensively investigated, the physical and chemical effects of fuel on GCI are rarely reported at different combustion modes. Therefore, in this study, the effect of physical and chemical properties of fuels on GCI is investigated. In-order to investigate the reported problem, low octane gasoline fuels with same RON = 70 but different physical properties and sensitivity (S) are chosen. Fuels with comparable sensitivity and RON are chosen to study the impact of physical properties on GCI. On the other hand, by keeping the same RON and physical properties, the effect of sensitivity on GCI is investigated. In this regard, three test…
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Low Load Limit Extension for Gasoline Compression Ignition Using Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

King Abdullah University of Science & Technology-R. Vallinayagam, Abdullah S. AlRamadan, S Vedharaj, Yanzhao An, Bengt Johansson
Saudi Aramco-Jaeheon Sim, Junseok Chang
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is widely studied for the benefits of simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxide (NOX) and soot emissions without compromising the engine efficiency. Despite this advantage, the operational range for GCI is not widely expanded, as the auto-ignition of fuel at low load condition is difficult. The present study aims to extend the low load operational limit for GCI using negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy. The engine used for the current experimentation is a single cylinder diesel engine that runs at an idle speed of 800 rpm with a compression ratio of 17.3. The engine is operated at homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and partially premixed combustion (PPC) combustion modes with the corresponding start of injection (SOI) at −180 CAD (aTDC) and −30 CAD (aTDC), respectively. In the presented work, intake air temperature is used as control parameter to maintain combustion stability at idle and low load condition, while the intake air pressure is maintained at 1 bar (ambient). The engine is equipped with variable valve cam phasers that can phase both inlet and exhaust…
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