Your Selections

NAE, Ford Motor Company
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

 

Vehicle Wind Buffeting Noise Reduction via Window Openings Optimization

NAE, Ford Motor Company-F. Chen, P. Qian
Published 2008-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Vehicle wind buffeting noise occurs when one window of a vehicle is opened in a certain way during driving. By optimizing window openings, the buffeting noise can be significantly reduced or may be even eliminated. In addition, the optimized window openings will also provide sufficient fresh air circulation while allows the driver still be able to enjoy listening to radio. This paper provides such an optimization and describes the principle with the results from both laser imaging and road tests.
Annotation icon
 

Disc Brake Squeal: An Overview

NAE, Ford Motor Company-F. Chen
Published 2007-04-16 by SAE International in United States
Understanding, reducing, eliminating and preventing brake squeal is a challenging task. It involves many design variables in a complex brake system and there are many harsh operational and environmental conditions under which squeal may occur. Much progress has been made on understanding brake squeal mechanisms and causes. Squeal simulation and analysis methods have been significantly advanced. The evaluation and testing technologies have been noticeably improved, and reduction remedies and prevention measures have become more mature. Brakes have become much quieter. However, the recurring occurrence of disc brake squeal indicates that there are still many challenges ahead and brake squeal is still an elusive quality issue. This overview provides the summary of some current developments and discusses remaining challenges along with future technologies. In addition it emphasizes the real world counter measures for squeal reduction, elimination and prevention.
Annotation icon
 

On Automotive Disc Brake Squeal Part IV Reduction and Prevention

NAE, Ford Motor Company-F. Chen, H. Tong, S. E. Chen, R. Quaglia
Published 2003-10-19 by SAE International in United States
This paper as part IV of a series articles first very briefly reviews squeal generation process in terms of energy transfer. A squeal reduction and prevention cascade chart including various contribute elements is formed. Subsequently, variation ranges of some key parameters of brake components and system due to manufacturing processes and operational/usage condition changes are given. Design concept of a broad stable and less vibration brake system is proposed and addressed in light of these variations. Robust design criteria and strategies are discussed. Design tools and methods are summarized. At last, some application examples are provided.
Annotation icon
 

On Automotive Disc Brake Squeal Part III Test and Evaluation

NAE, Ford Motor Company-F. Chen, J. Swayze
Robert Bosch Corporation-M.K. Abdelhamid, P. Blaschke
Published 2003-05-05 by SAE International in United States
This article, as part III of a series, briefly reviews some of the representative literature on brake squeal testing and evaluation. It discusses the potential influence of variation within brake components and operational conditions on brake squeal dynamometer tests and their correlation to vehicle road tests. Roles and challenges of component/system parameter measurements such as brake pad damping, disc rotor in-plane mode and friction induced vibration characteristics, friction coefficient, moisture absorption and elastic constants of lining material, and contact stiffness are addressed. An application example of a reliability method to assure dynamometer test results are statistically significant is presented. The advantages of using laser metrology are also briefly described, especially the measurement of 3D squeal operational deflection shape. Lastly, general future research directions are outlined.
Annotation icon
 

On Automotive Disc Brake Squeal Part I: Mechanisms and Causes

NAE, Ford Motor Company-F. Chen, R. L. Quaglia
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University-C. A. Tan
Published 2003-03-03 by SAE International in United States
The understanding, prediction and prevention of brake squeal is a difficult and challenging problem because of the large number of design variables involved in a complex brake system and many operational and environmental conditions under which squeal may occur. The design variables may have different optimal values and different contribution trends for different brake systems. Since the 1930's, much progress has been made in gaining physical insight into brake squeal mechanisms and causes, and brakes have become quieter. However, the recurring occurrence of disc brake squeal indicates that our understanding of the phenomenon is both insufficient and incomplete, and that brake squeal is still a quality issue in the automotive industry and its prevention is far from reality. Part I of this series of articles first reviews the various hypotheses put forth for brake squeal mechanisms and causes. Subsequently, it discusses some refined thoughts, and new results obtained from recently developed test/analysis methods by which the unified hypotheses are proposed.
Annotation icon