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Effect of Fuel Type and Tip Deposits on End of Injection Spray Characteristics of Gasoline Direct Injection Fuel Injectors

Michigan Technological University-Robert A. Schroeter, Jeffrey Naber, Seong-Young Lee
Ford Motor Co., Ltd.-Mark Meinhart
Published 2019-10-22 by SAE International in United States
There has been a great effort expended in identifying causes of Hydro-Carbon (HC) and Particulate Matter (PM) emissions resulting from poor spray preparation, leading to characterization of fueling behavior near nozzle. It has been observed that large droplet size is a primary contributor to HC and PM emission. Imaging technologies have been developed to understand the break-up and consistency of fuel spray. However, there appears to be a lack of studies of the spray characteristics at the End of Injection (EOI), near nozzle, in particular, the effect that tip deposits have on the EOI characteristics. Injector tip deposits are of interest due to their effect on not only fuel spray characteristics, but also their unintended effect on engine out emissions. Using a novel imaging technique to extract near nozzle fuel characteristics at EOI, the impact of tip deposits on Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) fuel injectors at the EOI is being examined in this work. Additionally, the impact of the test fuel used will also be evaluated. This work will present the large influence of fuel…
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Design and Validation of Low-Cost Intensity Probe

Michigan Technological University-Karan Gundre, Andrew Barnard
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
Sound intensity measurement techniques that used a two-microphone configuration, were first developed in the late 1970s. Originally, the focus was on improving precision during testing or post-processing. However, with the advent of modern, sophisticated equipment, the focus has shifted to the apparatus. Availability of phase-matched microphones has made post-test correction obsolete as the microphones eliminate a majority of the errors before the data is even collected. This accuracy, however, comes at a cost, as phase-matched microphones are highly priced. This paper discusses employing the method of improving post-processing precision, using inexpensive, current equipment. The phase error of the system is corrected using a simple calibration technique and a handheld phase calibrator that is similar to the one used for amplitude calibration of microphones. The intensity probe and calibrator is manufactured using rapid prototyping and the executable software that goes with the probe is designed in NI LabVIEW. The entire setup uses inexpensive parts to lower the cost and modern software to compensate for the errors due to these parts. The design of the probe and…
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The Utilization of Onboard Sensor Measurements for Estimating Driveline Damping

Michigan Technological University-Jon Furlich, Jason Blough, Darrell Robinette
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
The proliferation of small silicon micro-chips has led to a large assortment of low-cost transducers for data acquisition. Production vehicles on average exploit more than 60 on board sensors, and that number is projected to increase beyond 200 per vehicle by 2020. Such a large increase in sensors is leading the fourth industrial revolution of connectivity and autonomy. One major downfall to installing many sensors is compromises in their accuracy and processing power due to cost limitations for high volume production. The same common errors in data acquisition such as sampling, quantization, and multiplexing on the CAN bus must be accounted for when utilizing an entire array of vehicle sensors. A huge advantage of onboard sensors is the ability to calculate vehicle parameters during a daily drive cycle to update ECU calibration factors in real time. One such parameter is driveline damping, which changes with gear state and drive mode. A damping value is desired for every gear state. Recent years have seen an increasing number of forward gear ratios, from 8-10 in production vehicles.…
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Testing Methods and Signal Processing Strategies for Automatic Transmission Transient Multiplexed Pressure Data

Michigan Technological University-Mark Woodland, Jason Blough, Darrell Robinette, Carl Anderson
Ford Motor Company-Steve Frait, Ram Sudarsan Devendran
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
Transmissions have multiple transient events that occur from gear shifting to torque converter clutch application. These transients can be difficult to capture and observe. A six speed front wheeled drive transmission was instrumented with pressure transducers to measure clutches and the torque converter. Due to size restrictions internal to the torque converter the data had to be multiplexed across three different transmitters. A method to capture a transient event through the use of multiplexed data was developed to create a data set with the transient event occurring on each channel. Once testing is completed, the data has to be split into individual channels and synced with the operational data. The data then can be used in both time and frequency domain analysis. It is important to understand that the data is not continuous and must be taken into consideration when post processing it for further results.
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Multi-Physics and CFD Analysis of an Enclosed Coaxial Carbon Nanotube Speaker for Automotive Exhaust Noise Cancellation

Michigan Technological University-Suraj Madhav Prabhu, Andrew Barnard, Steven Senczyszyn
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
Automotive exhaust noise is one of the major sources of noise pollution and it is controlled by passive control system (mufflers) and active control system (loudspeakers and active control algorithm). Mufflers are heavy, bulky and large in size while loudspeakers have a working temperature limitation. Carbon nanotube (CNT) speakers generate sound due to the thermoacoustic effect. CNT speakers are also lightweight, flexible, have acoustic and light transparency as well as high operating temperature. These properties make them ideal to overcome the limitations of the current exhaust noise control systems. An enclosed, coaxial CNT speaker is designed for exhaust noise cancellation application. The development of a 3D multi-physics (coupling of electrical, thermal and acoustical domains) model, for the coaxial speaker is discussed in this paper. The model is used to simulate the sound pressure level, input power versus ambient temperature and efficiency. The 3D model provides accurate results of the temperature profile and heat flow as compared to a 2D model. Also, the flow of exhaust gases can be efficiently modeled using a 3D model. The…
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Methods of Pegging Cylinder Pressure to Maximize Data Quality

Michigan Technological University-Siddharth Bharat Gopujkar
Michigan Tech APS LABS-Jeremy Worm
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Engine cylinder pressure is traditionally measured with a piezo-electric pressure transducer, and as such, must be referenced or pegged to a known value. Frequently, the cylinder pressure is pegged to the pressure in the intake manifold plenum whereby the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) at the end of the intake stroke is measured and the cylinder pressure trace for the entire cycle is adjusted such that the cylinder pressure is set equal to the manifold pressure at the end of the intake stroke. However, any error in pegging induces an error in the cylinder pressure trace, which has an adverse effect on the entire combustion analysis. This research is focused on assessing the pegging error for several pegging methods across a wide range of engine operating conditions, and ultimately determining best practices to minimize error in pegging and the calculated combustion metrics. The study was conducted through 1D simulations using the commercially available GT-Power. The test matrix included variations of speed, load, intake runner length and intake valve timing. Five different pegging locations were compared, and…
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PHEV Real World Driving Cycle Energy and Fuel and Consumption Reduction Potential for Connected and Automated Vehicles

Michigan Technological University-Darrell Robinette, Eric Kostreva, Alexandra Krisztian, Anthony Lackey, Christopher Morgan, Joshua Orlando, Neeraj Rama
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
This paper presents real-world driving energy and fuel consumption results for the second-generation Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). A drive cycle, local to Michigan Technological University, was designed to mimic urban and highway driving test cycles in terms of distance, transients and average velocity, but with significant elevation changes to establish an energy intensive real-world driving cycle for assessing potential energy savings for connected and automated vehicle (CAV) control. The investigation began by establishing baseline and repeatability of energy consumption at various battery states of charge. It was determined that drive cycle energy consumption under a randomized set of boundary conditions varied within 3.6% of mean energy consumption regardless of initial battery state of charge. After completing 30 baseline drive cycles, a design for six sigma (DFSS) L18 array was designed to look at sensitivity of a range of parameters to energy consumption as related to connected and automated vehicles to target highest return on engineering development effort. The parameters explored in the DFSS array that showed the most sensitivity, in order of…
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Control-Oriented Modeling of a Vehicle Drivetrain for Shuffle and Clunk Mitigation

Michigan Technological University-Prithvi Reddy, Kaushal Darokar, Darrell Robinette, Mahdi Shahbakhti, Jason Blough
Ford Research & Advanced Engineering-Maruthi Ravichandran, Mary Farmer, Jeff Doering
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Flexibility and backlash of vehicle drivelines typically cause unwanted oscillations and noise, known as shuffle and clunk, during tip-in and tip-out events. Computationally efficient and accurate driveline models are necessary for the design and evaluation of torque shaping strategies to mitigate this shuffle and clunk. To accomplish these goals, this paper develops a full-order physics-based model and uses this model to develop a reduced-order model (ROM), which captures the main dynamics that influence the shuffle and clunk phenomena. The full-order model (FOM) comprises several components, including the engine as a torque generator, backlash elements as discontinuities, and propeller and axle shafts as compliant elements. This model is experimentally validated using the data collected from a Ford vehicle. The validation results indicate less than 1% error between the model and measured shuffle oscillation frequencies. The reduced-order model is derived by lumping 24 inertia elements into 2 elements, 3 stiffness and damping elements into 2 elements, and 2 backlashes into 1 element. As part of the reduced-order model development, the paper (i) investigates the effect of using…
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Spark Mechanism in High Speed Flow

Michigan Technological University-Mary P. Zadeh, Henry Schmidt, William Atkinson, Jeffrey Naber
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
An experimental study was performed to investigate spark ignition and subsequent spark stretch evolution in an inert environment at high- flow velocities up to 32 m/s across the spark plug gap in a constant-volume optical combustion-vessel at pressures representative of those in an engine. The vessel is capable of generating various in-cylinder thermodynamic conditions representative of light-duty spark ignition engines. The characteristic behavior of the spark was investigated using both a high-speed optical diagnostics and electrical measurement. Charge gas pressures were varied from 15 to 45 bar. Results show that the spark, flowing downstream the spark plug, is subject to short circuits of the spark channel and/or restrikes. The frequency of the restrike increased with increased flow velocity and charge gas pressure and decreased discharge current level. The position of the ground electrode with respect to the flow and the gap size, as well as the flow velocity and charge gas pressure, were determined to have a significant influence on spark plasma development and electrical discharge prediction. It was observed that a wider spark plug…
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Numerical Parametric Study of a Six-Stroke Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) Engine Combustion

Michigan Technological University-Oudumbar Rajput, Youngchul Ra
Hyundai Motor Co.-Kyoung-Pyo Ha
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Numerical investigation of engine performance and emissions of a six-stroke gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engine combustion at low load conditions is presented. In order to identify the effects of additional two strokes of the six-stroke engine cycle on the thermal and chemical conditions of charge mixtures, an in-house multi-dimensional CFD code coupled with high fidelity physical sub-models along with the Chemkin library was employed. The combustion and emissions were calculated using a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for a 14-component gasoline surrogate fuel. Two power strokes per cycle were achieved using multiple injections during compression strokes.Parametric variations of injection strategy viz., individual injection timing for both the power strokes and the split ratio that enable the control of combustion phasing of both the power strokes were explored. The computational results suggest that the operability limit of GCI combustion can be effectively expanded by controlling the mixture thermodynamic conditions and achieving optimum mixture stratification. It was uniquely found that the charge mixtures could burn in the mixing-controlled mode during the second power stroke with the injection timing…
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