Your Selections

Kettering Univ.
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Characterizing the Safety of Automated Vehicles: Book 1 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-203
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. Characterizing the Safety of Automated Vehicles addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include functional safety, SOTIF, and multi-agent safety. As the first title in a series on automated vehicle safety, each will contain introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic of that book.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

The Safety of Controllers, Sensors, and Actuators: Book 5 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-207
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. The Safety of Controllers, Sensors, and Actuators addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include risk reduction techniques in semiconductor-based systems, component certification, and safety assessment and audits for vehcicle components. As the fifth title in a series on automated vehicle safety, this contains introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Safety of the Intended Functionality: Book 3 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-205
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. Safety of the Intended Functionality (SOTIF) addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include the system engineering management approach and redundancy technical approach to safety. As the third title in a series on automated vehicle safety, this contains introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic of that book.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Multi-Agent Safety: Book 2 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-204
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. Multi-Agent Safety addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include vehicle interaction with other vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, and other road objects. As the second title in a series on automated vehicle safety, each will contain introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic of that book.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

The Role of ISO 26262: Book 4 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-206
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. The Role of ISO 26262 addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include model-based systems engineering (MBSE) and the use of SysML language in a management-based approach to safety As the fourth title in a series on automated vehicle safety, this contains introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Fundamentals of Integrated Vehicle Realization

Kettering Univ.-Mohamed El-Sayed
  • Book
  • R-436
Published 2017-09-25 by SAE International in United States
Fundamentals of Integrated Vehicle Realization is a unique and solid contribution to the subject of product development, centered on the automotive industry. Automotive manufacturers and suppliers are under pressure to transform themselves and deliver a higher level of product refinement coupled with more functionality. This could lead to the sprouting of organizational structures not in alignment with the required product development phases. Consequently, many product development initiatives may be cancelled or dropped at later stages despite all the efforts and financial investments. Therefore, it is vital that organizational unity be always intact during any transformation. A highly effective organization should always act as one cohesive entity dedicated to serving the customer with creative aptitude, integrative skills, analytical thinking, and synergistic management. Written by Dr. Mohamed El-Sayed, director of the School of Engineering Technology at Eastern Michigan University, Fundamentals of Integrated Vehicle Realization addresses an essential need for deep knowledge in the realm of vehicle development process, from idealization to market launch. The book covers realization process phases, process and vehicle characteristics and attributes, front-end innovation,…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Value Streaming Through Customer Participation in Product Realization

SAE International Journal of Materials and Manufacturing

Kettering Univ.-Mohamed El-Sayed
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-0344
Published 2016-04-05 by SAE International in United States
Success in lean product realization depends on the ability to specify value from the voice of the customer at the beginning of the process. Value streaming, is therefore essential for assuring that the specified value is being pursued and achieved throughout the process. During lean implementation, however, it is usually assumed that nothing but value will be streamed if wastes are eliminated using value stream mapping. While waste elimination is necessary to make the process leaner and facilitate value streaming it is not sufficient for assuring that specified value is being streamed without structured and formalized participation of customers.With current structure of product realization processes, the voice of the customer is provided during the planning phase at the beginning of the process and customer satisfaction feedback is provided after product launch. With limited customer Participation during the process it is harder to assure that the voice of the customer specified value is being streamed. Shifting the process paradigm from planning, design, and manufacturing to the natural phases of inception, conception, and maturation would allow more…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Commercial Viability Study for LPG as Alternative Mass Transportation Fuel

Kettering Univ.-Mohamed El-Sayed
McLean Consulting & Associates Inc.-Lynn C. McLean
Published 2015-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG, is a byproduct of both natural gas processing and crude oil refining. As a chemical, propane (C3H8) is a nontoxic, colorless, and virtually odorless hydrocarbon. It is economical to store and transport in liquefied form.Due its availability and adoptability as engine fuel, propane is quickly becoming one of the viable alternatives fueling 17 million vehicles worldwide. So far, there are about 270,000 propane fueled vehicles in the U. S. This number represents about 1.6 percent of the world propane fueled vehicles.In this paper, a commercial viability a multi-year cost study of captive fleet buses is conducted for LPG as alternative mass transportation fuel in comparison with gasoline and diesel. The study is based on more than four million of recorded mass transportation service miles. To address some of the key issues in LPG utilization as an alternative fuel for mass transportation some of the key issues such as safety, environmental issues, fueling infrastructure, and fleet vehicle contents are discussed.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Side Impact Testing of the Near-Side, Rear Seat Occupant Using a Deceleration Sled

Kettering Univ.-Sheryl Janca, Janet Brelin-Fornari, Massoud Tavakoli
Hyundai America Technical Center-Kurt Shanks, Ravi Tangirala
Published 2014-04-01 by SAE International in United States
A near-side, rear seat side impact component test, was conducted and validated utilizing a SIDIIs anthropomorphic test device (ATD). The test fixture consisted of the rear seat structure, side door, interior trim, and side airbag curtain module. Test parameters were determined from full scale tests including impact speed, angle of impact, and depth of door intrusion. A comparative assessment was conducted between the full scale test and the deceleration sled test including ATD contact with the vehicle interior, contact duration, sequential timing of ATD contact, and dummy injury measures. Validation was achieved so that the deceleration sled test procedure could be utilized for further evaluations.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Pulse Sensitivity of a Child Restraint System, Near-Side Impact Fixture

Kettering Univ.-Janet Brelin-Fornari, Sheryl Janca
Published 2014-04-01 by SAE International in United States
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has utilized a two part sled fixture to evaluate a near side test protocol for child restraint systems (CRS). The test was designed to impact the CRS with a fixed door at nearly 20 mph. This paper examines the affects of various fixture parameters on the acceleration and velocity profiles of the two part system during the impact event. It was determined that the kinematic time histories are sensitive to crush energy dissipation (as evaluated with variance in aluminum honeycomb volume) and fixture weight. It was also determined that payload weight, impact speed, and impact plane alignment have a small effect on the acceleration and velocity profiles. Even though the kinematics of the secondary carriage was small with the change in the impact plane alignment, it was determined that the CRS utilized in the standard test would have a 23% reduction in impact energy when compared to the CRS with the impact planes aligned.
Annotation ability available