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Analysis of Berla iVe Acquisitions of Vehicle Speed Data from Ford Sync Systems

SAE International Journal of Transportation Safety

Biomechanics Analysis-Robert Anderson
Collision and Injury Dynamics, Inc.-Wesley Vandiver
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-1442
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Many modern automobiles’ infotainment/navigation systems store vehicle telematics and user-supplied infotainment data. This data is useful in a wide variety of analyses but is not available through traditional OEM tools. The necessity to access the infotainment module data for forensic analysis can be satisfied by utilizing the Berla iVe system. Similar to CDR/EDR technology, Berla iVe is a hardware and software tool that is used to acquire and analyze stored automotive data. However, CDR/EDR systems are generally developed in partnership with manufacturers or OEM suppliers. Berla iVe is a privately developed forensic system analogous to traditional forensic tools used to interrogate computer hard drives and smartphones. The technology is privately developed and tested. The data is then parsed using recognized forensics practices.This research was focused on assessing the accuracy of speed data recorded in certain modules and the resulting translations reported by the Berla iVe system. While a number of manufacturers’ vehicles store a variety of infotainment data, this project was limited to Ford Sync Generation 2 (SG2) and Generation 3 (SG3) systems. A series…
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Further Validation of Equations for Motorcycle Lean on a Curve

SAE International Journal of Transportation Safety

Kineticorp LLC-Nathan A. Rose, Neal Carter, Connor Smith
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0529
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Previous studies have reported and validated equations for calculating the lean angle required for a motorcycle and rider to traverse a curved path at a particular speed. In 2015, Carter, Rose, and Pentecost reported physical testing with motorcycles traversing curved paths on an oval track on a pre-marked range in a relatively level parking lot. Several trends emerged in this study. First, while theoretical lean angle equations prescribe a single lean angle for a given lateral acceleration, there was considerable scatter in the real-world lean angles employed by motorcyclists for any given lateral acceleration level. Second, the actual lean angle was nearly always greater than the theoretical lean angle.This prior study was limited in that it only examined the motorcycle lean angle at the apex of the curves. The research reported here extends the previous study by examining the accuracy of the lean angle formulas throughout the curves. The degree to which these equations can be used to model the development of lean as the rider enters a curve is evaluated. The prior study was…
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Passenger Vehicle-Motorcycle Pre-Crash Trajectory Reconstruction and Conflict Analysis Results Based on an Extended Application of the Honda-DRI ACAT Safety Impact Methodology

SAE International Journal of Transportation Safety

Dynamic Research, Inc.-R. Michael Van Auken, John Lenkeit, Terrance Smith
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0510
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Advanced Crash Avoidance Technologies (ACATs) such as Forward Collision Warning (FCW) and Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) have been developed for light passenger vehicles (LPVs) to avoid and mitigate collisions with other road users and objects. However, the number of motorcycle (MC) crashes, injuries, and fatalities in the United States has remained relatively constant. To fully realize potential safety benefits, advanced driver assistance systems and future automated vehicle technologies also need to be effective in avoiding collisions with motorcycles. Toward this goal the Honda-DRI ACAT Safety Impact Methodology (SIM), which was previously developed to evaluate LPV ACAT system effectiveness in avoiding and mitigating collisions with fixed objects, other LPVs, and pedestrians, is being extended to also evaluate the effectiveness of ACATs in avoiding and mitigating LPV-MC collisions. Initial efforts have involved extending the ACAT SIM Crash Scenario Database Development Tools to reconstruct real-world LPV-MC pre-crash/crash scenarios based on the recently completed Motorcycle Crash Causation Study (MCCS) data. Pre-crash trajectory reconstruction results using this extended tool indicate three main types of LPV-MC pre-crash conflicts. These results also…
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Using Multiple Photographs and USGS LiDAR to Improve Photogrammetric Accuracy

SAE International Journal of Transportation Safety

Kineticorp LLC-Toby Terpstra, Jordan Dickinson, Alireza Hashemian
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0516
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The accident reconstruction community relies on photogrammetry for taking measurements from photographs. Camera matching, a close-range photogrammetry method, is a particularly useful tool for locating accident scene evidence after time has passed and the evidence is no longer physically visible. In this method, objects within the accident scene that have remained unchanged are used as a reference for locating evidence that is no longer physically available at the scene such as tire marks, gouge marks, and vehicle points of rest. Roadway lines, edges of pavement, sidewalks, signs, posts, buildings, and other structures are recognizable scene features that if unchanged between the time of accident and time of analysis are beneficial to the photogrammetric process. In instances where these scene features are limited or do not exist, achieving accurate photogrammetric solutions can be challenging. Off-road incidents, snow-covered roadways, rural areas, and unpaved roadways are examples where available scene features may be limited. Other factors like the number of photographs, the specific vantage of the photographs, and occlusion of recognizable features within these photographs can also limit…
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Open Access

Cellular Helmet Liner Design through Bio-inspired Structures and Topology Optimization of Compliant Mechanism Lattices

SAE International Journal of Transportation Safety

Indiana University, Purdue University-Joel C. Najmon, Jacob DeHart, Zebulun Wood, Andres Tovar
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-1057
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The continuous development of sport technologies constantly demands advancements in protective headgear to reduce the risk of head injuries. This article introduces new cellular helmet liner designs through two approaches. The first approach is the study of energy-absorbing biological materials. The second approach is the study of lattices comprised of force-diverting compliant mechanisms. On the one hand, bio-inspired liners are generated through the study of biological, hierarchical materials. An emphasis is given on structures in nature that serve similar concussion-reducing functions as a helmet liner. Inspiration is drawn from organic and skeletal structures. On the other hand, compliant mechanism lattice (CML)-based liners use topology optimization to synthesize rubber cellular unit cells with effective positive and negative Poisson’s ratios. Three lattices are designed using different cellular unit cell arrangements, namely, all positive, all negative, and alternating effective Poisson’s ratios. The proposed cellular (bio-inspired and CML-based) liners are embedded between two polycarbonate shells, thereby, replacing the traditional expanded polypropylene foam liner used in standard sport helmets. The cellular liners are analyzed through a series of 2D extruded…
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