Terms:
SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants
AND
11
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

RETRACTION NOTICE

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Andhra University-I.N. Niranjan Kumar
Andhra University and Lakireddy Bali Reddy College of Engineering-K.N.D. Malleswara Rao
  • Journal Article
  • 04-11-02-0010.1
Published 2018-10-18 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

ERRATUM

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Innospec-Jim Barker, Jacqueline Reid
Univ. of Nottingham-David Scurr
  • Journal Article
  • 2017-01-2293.01
Published 2017-10-08 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Improvement in DCT Shaft Lubrication through CFD Method

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Geely Powertrain Research Institute, China-Ting Su
Hebei University of Technology, China-Hai Liu, Libin Zang
  • Journal Article
  • 04-11-03-0011
Published 2018-10-25 by SAE International in United States
Dual-clutch transmission (DCT) output shaft 1 (OS1) mount position is higher than the transmission lubricant level. Needle bearings and idler gears on OS1-insufficient lubrication issues and the transmission lubrication system were investigated. In the design model, the transmission housing lubrication channel and oil guide component design were studied. For numerical analysis, the STAR-CCM+ software was used to simulate transmission internal complex oil-gas multiphase transient flow morphology that monitored the four bore oil churning volumes of OS1. Finally, lubrication test results affirm simulation predictions that idler gears, needle bearings, and synchronizer rings on OS1 obtain sufficient lubrication provided that a reliable method to inspect lubrication design functions is available.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

The Impacts of Pd in BEA Zeolite on Decreasing Cold-Start NMOG Emission of an E85 Fuel Vehicle

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Research and Innovation Center, Ford Motor Co., USA-Lifeng Xu, Jason Lupescu, Giovanni Cavataio, Kevin Guo, Hungwen Jen
  • Journal Article
  • 04-11-03-0013
Published 2018-10-25 by SAE International in United States
In the development of hydrocarbon (HC) traps for E85 fuel vehicle emission control, the addition of palladium (Pd) to BEA zeolite was studied for trapping and decreasing cold-start ethanol emissions. BEA zeolite after a laboratory aging at 750°C for 25 hours released nearly all of the trapped ethanol as unconverted ethanol at low temperature, and some ethene was released at a higher temperature by a dehydration reaction. The addition of Pd to BEA zeolite showed a decrease in the release of unconverted ethanol emissions even after the lab aging. The release of methane (CH4), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), carbon monoxide (CO), and CO2 from Pd-BEA zeolite during desorption (temperature programmed desorption (TPD)) demonstrated that multiple ethanol reaction mechanisms were involved including dehydrogenation and decomposition reactions. The amount of Pd loading in BEA zeolite showed a diminished benefit toward eliminating unconverted ethanol release as the Pd loading increased above 0.2 wt% zeolite. Vehicle emission (with E85 fuel) test results also confirmed the benefits of Pd in zeolite in reducing cold-start non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

RETRACTED: Improved Lubrication Properties and Characterization of GO Nanoparticles as Lubricant Additives on Hypereutectic Al-17Si/AISI25100 Steel Sliding Pair

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Andhra University-I.N. Niranjan Kumar
Andhra University and Lakireddy Bali Reddy College of Engineering-K.N.D. Malleswara Rao
  • Journal Article
  • 04-11-02-0010
Published 2018-06-14 by SAE International in United States
SAE International has retracted this article.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Autoignition of Isooctane beyond RON and MON Conditions

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

King Abdullah University of Science & Technology-Jean-Baptiste Masurier, Muhammad Waqas, Mani Sarathy, Bengt Johansson
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-1254
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The present study experimentally examines the low-temperature autoignition area of isooctane within the in-cylinder pressure-in-cylinder temperature map.Experiments were run with the help of a Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine. The boundaries of this engine were extended so that experiments could be performed outside the domain delimited by research octane number (RON) and motor octane number (MON) traces. Since homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion is governed by kinetics, the rotation speed for all the experiments was set at 600 rpm to allow time for low-temperature heat release (LTHR). All the other parameters (intake pressure, intake temperature, compression ratio, and equivalence ratio) were scanned, such as the occurrence of isooctane combustion.The principal results showed that LTHR for isooctane occurs effortlessly under high intake pressure (1.3 bar) and low intake temperature (25 °C). Increasing the intake temperature leads to the loss of the LTHR and therefore to a smaller domain on the pressure-temperature trace. In such a case, the LTHR domain is restricted from 20 to 50 bar in pressure and from 600 to 850 K in…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Dividing Flow-Weighted Sampling Approach in Partial Flow Dilution System for Particulate Emission Measurement in Internal Combustion Engine Exhaust

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Horiba Instruments Incorporated-Montajir Rahman
Horiba Ltd.-Yoshinori Otsuki, Kazuhiko Haruta
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0645
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Light-duty vehicle emission measurement test protocols defined in the Code of Federal Regulation (40 CFR Part 1066) allow sampling particulate matter (PM) of all phases of Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) on a single PM sampling filter by means of flow-weighted sampling in order to increase PM mass loaded on the filter. A technical challenge is imposed especially for partial flow dilution systems (PFDS) to maintain a precise dilution ratio (DR) over such a wide sample flow range due to the subtraction flow determination method of dilution air and diluted exhaust flows, because the flow difference is critical at high DR conditions. In this study, an improved flow weighting concept is applied to a PFDS by installing a bypass line with a flow controller in parallel with the PM sampling filter in order to improve DR accuracy during flow-weighted sampling. The diluted exhaust flow of the PFDS is kept constant and the flow through the PM sampling filter is adjusted by dividing the total diluted exhaust flow between the PM sampling filter and the bypass line.…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Investigation of Particle Number Emission Characteristics in a Heavy-Duty Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil (HVO)

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Lund University-Pravesh Chandra Shukla, Sam Shamun, Louise Gren, Vilhelm Malmborg, Joakim Pagels, Martin Tuner
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0909
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Diesel engines are one of the most important power generating units these days. Increasing greenhouse gas emission level and the need for energy security has prompted increasing research into alternative fuels for diesel engines. Biodiesel is the most popular among the alternatives for diesel fuel as it is biodegradable and renewable and can be produced domestically from vegetable oils. In recent years, hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) has also gained popularity due to some of its advantages over biodiesel such as higher cetane number, lower deposit formation, storage stability, etc. HVO is a renewable, paraffinic biobased alternative fuel for diesel engines similar to biodiesel. Unlike biodiesel, the production process for HVO involves hydrogen as catalyst instead of methanol which removes oxygen content from vegetable oil. A modified six-cylinder heavy-duty diesel engine (modified for operation with single cylinder) was used for studying particle number emission characteristics for HVO fuel. The investigation was performed for varying fuel injection pressure at various engine operating loads (6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 bar IMEP). Five rail pressures were chosen from…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Tier 2 Test Fuel Impact to Tier 3 Aftertreatment Systems and Calibration Countermeasures

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Ford Advanced Vehicle Technology-Eugene D. White
Ford Motor Company-Bruce Anderson, Paul Ranspach
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-0941
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
During the course of emissions and fuel economy (FE) testing, vehicles that are calibrated to meet Tier 3 emissions requirements currently must demonstrate compliance on Tier 3 E10 fuel while maintaining emissions capability with Tier 2 E0 fuel used for FE label determination. Tier 3 emissions regulations prescribe lower sulfur E10 gasoline blends for the U.S. market. Tier 3 emissions test fuels specified by EPA are required to contain 9.54 volume % ethanol and 8-11 ppm sulfur content. EPA Tier 2 E0 test fuel has no ethanol and has nominal 30 ppm sulfur content. Under Tier 3 rules, Tier 2 E0 test fuel is still used to determine FE. Tier 3 calibrations can have difficulty meeting low Tier 3 emissions targets while testing with Tier 2 E0 fuel. Research has revealed that the primary cause of the high emissions is deactivation of the aftertreatment system due to sulfur accumulation on the catalysts. The emissions drive cycles used in the test sequence play a significant role in catalyst deactivation. It is possible to desulfur the catalyst…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Impact of Siloxanes in Biomethane on the Performance of a CNG Vehicle

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

DNV GL-Martijn van Essen, Pieter Visser, Sander Gersen, Howard Levinsky
  • Journal Article
  • 04-11-01-0003
Published 2018-03-23 by SAE International in United States
In this article, the results of experiments to determine the effects of silicon-containing compounds in biogas on the performance of spark-ignited gas engines for use in CNG vehicles are presented. Initial research was performed on micro-CHP units, which have many features common with automotive engines, to identify engine components sensitive for silica deposition prior to investigating a practical CNG engine. The experiments on the micro-CHP units revealed that the catalyst was the most sensitive part for silica fouling, with strong impact on the reduction of NOx. With the insight gained from these experiments, an 9-week endurance test was performed on a light-duty CNG vehicle. While the wideband-type lambda sensor originally installed upstream of the catalyst did not fail during the test, an additional switching-type lambda sensor positioned upstream of the catalyst was found to be most sensitive to silica deposition, causing a false signal regarding the oxygen content in the exhaust gas (“failure”). In contrast to the micro-CHP test, the catalyst used in the CNG vehicle was not affected by silica deposition under the experimental…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available