Terms:
SAE International Journal of Aerospace
AND
9
AND
2
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Automated FML Manufacturing for Aircraft Fuselages

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Premium AEROTEC GmbH-Hilmar Apmann
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-2112
Published 2016-09-27 by SAE International in United States
As a new material FML, made by aluminum foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg, is a real alternative to common materials for fuselages of aircrafts like monolithic aluminum or CFRP. Since experiences within A380 this material has some really good advantages and develops to the status as alternative to aluminum and composite structures.To become FML as a real alternative to aluminum and carbon structures there are many things to improve: design, material, costs and process chain. So following one of the main goals for an industrial application for high production rates of aircrafts is the automation of production processes inside the process chain for FML-parts like skins and panels for fuselages. To reach this goal for high production rates first steps of automation inside this new process chain have been developed in the last two years. Main steps is the automated lay-up of metallic foils and Glasfiber-Prepreg. Over this there are some more steps within positioning of i.e. stringers and doublers by automatic integration and also in parallel shorter process chain to reduce process cost significantly.Different concepts and…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Evaluation of Control Methods for Thermal Roll Forming of Aerospace Composite Materials.

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Airbus UK-Harvey Brookes, Jon Wright
University of Nottingham-Patrick Land, Luis De Sousa, Svetan Ratchev, David Branson
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-2118
Published 2016-09-27 by SAE International in United States
With increased demand for composite materials in the aerospace sector there is a requirement for the development of manufacturing processes that enable larger and more complex geometries, whilst ensuring that the functionality and specific properties of the component are maintained. To achieve this, methods such as thermal roll forming are being considered. This method is relatively new to composite forming in the aerospace field, and as such there are currently issues with the formation of part defects during manufacture. Previous work has shown that precise control of the force applied to the composite surface during forming has the potential to prevent the formation of wrinkle defects. In this paper the development of various control strategies that can robustly adapt to different complex geometries are presented and compared within simulated and small scale experimental environments, on varying surface profiles. Results have found that traditional PID control can be utilized, although its robustness under varying conditions reduces performance in situations that are far from the tuned scenario. This causes the PID controller to struggle with geometries containing…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Process Understanding of Dry Drilling CFRP/Aluminium and AL/AL Stacks in IT8 Quality

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Mapal Dr Kress KG-Peter Mueller-Hummel
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-2116
Published 2016-09-27 by SAE International in United States
Drilling holes into metal with MQL (Minimal Quantity Lubrication) is a normal procedure, because the drill is designed for drilling metal and the malleable capability of the metal compensates for the insufficient cutting capability of a worn out drill. Drilling composite materials using the same drill (designed for drilling metal) is a different procedure, because composite fibers are not malleable like metal at all. Due to this fact the tools become very hot trying to forge composite fibers like metal. The elastic behavior of the composite and the delamination inside the hole makes the tool temporary smaller than the diameter of the drill.The hole in the metal part of the stack remains slightly larger due to the heat and the thermal expansion rate. This paper shows how to drill metal and composite with the same diameter, so that achieving H8 quality is no longer a dream. Besides drilling H8 with cpk higher than 1.7, the dry drilling is one other important goal for aerospace assembly ever since. This paper will show how the dry drilling…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

High Accuracy Mobile Robotic System for Machining of Large Aircraft Components

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Fraunhofer IFAM-Hendrik Susemihl, Christian Moeller, Simon Kothe, Hans Christian Schmidt, Nihar Shah, Christoph Brillinger
Technical University Hamburg IPMT-Jörg Wollnack, Wolfgang Hintze
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-2139
Published 2016-09-27 by SAE International in United States
A mobile robotic system is presented as a new approach for machining applications of large aircraft components. Huge and heavy workshop machines are commonly used for components with large dimensions. The system presented in this paper consists of a standard serial robot kinematics and a mobile platform as well as a stereo camera system for optical measurements. Investigations of the entire system show that the mechanical design of the mobile platform has no significant influence on the machining accuracy. With mobile machines referencing becomes an important issue. This paper introduces an optical method for determining the position of the mobile platform in relation to the component and shows its accuracy limits. Furthermore, a method for increasing the absolute accuracy of the robots end-effector with help of stereo camera vision is presented. This publication shows that the mobile robotic system yields an efficient possibility for advanced machining processes of large-scaled aircraft structures in the Factory of the Future.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Powder Reuse and Its Effects on Laser Based Powder Fusion Additive Manufactured Alloy 718

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Honeywell Aerospace-Brian A. Hann
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-2071
Published 2016-09-20 by SAE International in United States
Laser Based Powder Bed Fusion, a specific application of additive manufacturing, has shown promise to replace traditionally fabricated components, including castings and wrought products (and multiple-piece assemblies thereof). In this process, powder is applied, layer by layer, to a build plate, and each layer is fused by a laser to the layers below. Depending on the component, it appears that only 3-5% of the powder charged into the powder bed fusion machine is fused. Honeywell’s initial part qualification efforts have prohibited the reuse of powder. Any unfused powder that exits the dispenser (i.e., surrounds the build or is captured in the overflow) is considered used. In order for the process to be broadly applicable in an economical manner, a methodology should be developed to render the balance of the powder (up to 97% of the initial charge weight) as re-usable. Though multiple manufacturers may be re-using powder, there is no industry standard methodology or practice for powder re-use. The present study (with 10 uses of the same powder lot) shows no appreciable impact on nickel-base…
Annotation ability available