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Landing Gear Shock Strut Bearing Selection

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5883A
  • Current
Published 2018-10-16 by SAE International in United States
This document defines the criteria used for the selection of landing gear shock strut upper and lower bearings (see Figure 1).
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External Hydraulic Fluid Leakage Definition for Landing Gear Shock Absorbers

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP6408
  • Current
Published 2018-07-25 by SAE International in United States
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to provide a practical definition of external hydraulic fluid leakage exhibited by landing gear shock absorbers/struts. The definition will outline normal (acceptable weepage) and excessive leakage (unacceptable leakage) of shock absorbers/struts that is measurable. The definition of leakage is applicable to new gear assemblies, refurbished/remanufactured (overhauled) shock absorbers/struts, leakage of shock absorbers/struts encountered during acceptance flights, newly delivered and in-service aircraft. This ARP is intended to provide guidelines for acceptable leakage of landing gear shock absorbers/struts between the ambient temperatures of -65 °F (-54 °C) and 130 °F (54 °C) and to outline the procedure for measuring such leakage. The specific limits that are applied to any particular aircraft shall be adjusted by the aircraft manufacturer before inclusion in the applicable maintenance manual.
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Landing Gear Servicing

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP5908A
  • Current
Published 2018-07-03 by SAE International in United States
The present document addresses gas and hydraulic fluid servicing required on commercial and military aircraft landing gears, for both single and dual chamber (also known as dual stage and two stage) shock struts. This document should be considered as landing gear industry recommended practice but in no way is meant to supersede the shock strut OEM’s published procedures.
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Landing Gear Component Heat Damage

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5913A
  • Current
Published 2018-07-02 by SAE International in United States
The purpose of this report is to outline types of in-service heat damage that have been observed in high strength steel landing gear components, with an emphasis on a particular type that is referred to as “Ladder Cracking” which can develop in landing gear shock struts. The report discusses how ladder cracking can be detected visually and evaluated by non-destructive inspection methods, and how it can be repaired at overhaul with the prior approval of the Original Equipment Manufacturer. This report also describes the use of a bearing material that has resolved this problem without introducing other problems. Examples of other types of service induced heat damage are also discussed.
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Landing Gear Structures and Mechanisms

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1311D
  • Current
Published 2018-06-03 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) applies to landing gear structures and mechanisms (excluding wheels, tires, and brakes and other landing gear systems) for all types and models of civil and military aircraft. All axles, wheel forks, links, arms, mechanical and gas/oil shock struts, downlock and uplock assemblies, braces, trunnion beams, and truck beams, etc., that sustain loads originating at the ground, and that are not integral parts of the airframe structure, should be designed and validated in accordance with this document. Hydraulic actuators (retraction, main and nose gear steering, positioning, damping, etc.) should also be included in this coverage. System level, non-structural components such as retraction/extension valves, controllers, secondary structure and mechanisms in the airframe (e.g., manual release mechanisms, slaved doors) as well as equipment that is located in the cockpit are not addressed in this ARP.
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Plain Bearing Selection for Landing Gear Applications

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1594D
  • Current
Published 2018-04-18 by SAE International in United States
This document is intended to give advisory information for the selection of plain bearings and bearing materials most suitable for aircraft landing gear applications. Information included herein was derived from bearing tests and service experience/reports. Airframe/landing gear manufacturers, commercial airlines, the U.S. Air Force and Naval Air Systems Command provided input for the document. Information is given on bearing installation methods and fits that have given satisfactory performance and service life. Base metal corrosion is a major cause of problems in bearing installations for landing gears. Therefore, methods of corrosion prevention are discussed. Effort is directed toward minimizing maintenance and maximizing life expectancy of landing gear bearings. Lubricated and self-lubricating bearings are also discussed. There are wide ranges of bearing load and motion requirements for applications in aircraft landing gears. For this reason, it is the responsibility of the designer to select that information which pertains to the particular application. Anti-friction bearings, defined as rolling element bearings generally used in wheel and live axle applications, will not be discussed in this document. Copper-Beryliium (Cu-Be) alloy…
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Mechanical Switch Usage for Landing Gear Applications

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR4077
  • Current
Published 2017-10-18 by SAE International in United States
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) will examine considerations relative to the use of mechanical switches on aircraft landing gear, and present "lessons learned" during the period that these devices have been used.
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Landing Gear Stability

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR4894
  • Current
Published 2017-10-18 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) discusses the nature of landing gear stability, describes many common landing gear stability problems, and suggests approaches and methods for solving or avoiding them.
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Tail Bumpers for Piloted Aircraft

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1107C
  • Current
Published 2017-07-14 by SAE International in United States
This recommended practice covers the fixed structure, or independent energy absorbing system affixed to the airframe to afford protection to the control surfaces, engine and other portions during ground handling, take-off and landing.
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Historical Design Information of Aircraft Landing Gear and Control Actuation Systems

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5565
  • Current
Published 2017-07-10 by SAE International in United States
This aerospace information report (AIR) provides historical design information for various aircraft landing gear and actuation/control systems that may be useful in the design of future systems for similar applications. It presents the basic characteristics, hardware descriptions, functional schematics, and discussions of the actuation mechanisms, controls, and alternate release systems. The report is divided into two basic sections: 1 Landing gear actuation system history from 1876 to the present. This section provides an overview and the defining examples that demonstrate the evolution of landing gear actuation systems to the present day. 2 This section of the report provides an in depth review of various aircraft. A summary table of aircraft detail contained within this section is provided in paragraph 4.1. The intent is to add new and old aircraft retraction/extension systems to this AIR as the data becomes available. NOTES 1 For some aircraft, the description is incomplete, due to difficulties in obtaining the data.
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